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There’s no way to sugarcoat it: If you’re an investor, you haven’t liked what you’ve seen in the financial markets recently. The effects of the coronavirus triggered a market “correction” – a decline of 10 percent or more – and more volatility is almost certainly on the way. But instead of fretting over your investment statements, you could consider some more positive approaches to this situation.

I wish I were writing this from the perspective of a person who had just lived through a traumatic event. That way I would have more peace of mind. Unfortunately, I am writing at the beginning of such an event. It gives me peace, though, to look back at the history of our country, our community and our company.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

A poll out this week suggests that less than 80 percent of U.S. Roman Catholics believe in the devil and that, of those, less than 80 percent (about 62 percent of the whole) believe the devil is not merely a personification or a symbol of evil but actually a fallen angel. Yet even those numbers are better than the quarter of American Christians surveyed more than a decade ago who said that they totally accepted the Bible’s teaching about the devil.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Like many Americans allergic to adulting, I often zone out on Facebook when I should be doing something more useful — like scooping the litter box or lecturing my children about the dangers of social media. Inevitably, I come across one of those surveys posted by Facebook users who are probably planning to hack into my account and steal my pet selfies.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am having a serious, lengthy battle with cellulitis on my lower leg. For nearly three months, nothing any doctor has recommended or prescribed has worked. The inflammation and skin discoloration have not abated even with three days of intravenous injections of antibiotics and three courses of antibiotic pills. I have soaked my leg in Epsom salt, used antibiotic creams, Vicks rub, aspirin for inflammation, raised my leg when I am sitting — all to no avail. The doctors I have seen seem to have thrown up their hands and offer no resolution. Every medical person who sees my leg immediately diagnoses the problem to be cellulitis. An ultrasound showed no blood clot.

Its 2020, and we all want clear vision. I’ve noticed a plethora of signs and advertisements from businesses, non-profits, and even churches who are seeking a “2020 vision” for the future.

Recently, we’ve seen an increased interest in mindfulness, although the concept itself is thousands of years old. Essentially, being mindful means you are living very much in the present, highly conscious of your thoughts and feelings.

DEAR DR. ROACH: There are a lot of flu cases in my state, and people are very worried. My mom, a retired nurse, says that I should wash my hands several times a day for at least 20 seconds each time, including under my nails, between my fingers, and the backs of my hands, because that will also prevent colds and other respiratory illnesses. She had to do this before entering an operating room, but this seems like overkill otherwise. Won’t a flu shot take care of any problem? — P.L.L.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I have recently been diagnosed as having early stages of cataracts. Is there anything I can do to reverse the cataracts or reduce their progression? I am 67, don’t smoke, drink in moderation, and have a glucose level under 100. I hear lanosterol eyedrops show promise. Is there any harm in trying them? — M.L.

Colossians 1:19 and 20 read like this: “For in him (Christ) all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.” Paul, here, speaks of Christ’s incarnation (vs. 19) and Christ’s crucifixion (vs. 20) as the means through which God effects reconciliation. That is to say, reconciliation not just for us but for the whole of creation.

DEAR DR. ROACH: My husband and I are very fortunate to have had a happy relationship for many years. Our lovemaking has always been a pleasure for both of us. Now, we have to add Viagra to the mix. Sometimes it works; sometimes it doesn’t, which is a disappointment to both of us. Is there anything we can do to enhance its effectiveness? Or is there something else you can recommend that would do what we wish Viagra would do consistently? — Anon.

This Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020, is the 47th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which gave women a constitutional right to abort the lives of children conceived in their wombs. That right may or may not withstand future Supreme Court scrutiny, such as that in a case related to a controversial Louisiana law, which will be heard in March of this year, by what is thought to be a more-conservative Supreme Court than that which heard its last case.

DEAR DR. ROACH: My 78-year-old father is experiencing the early signs of dementia. It has been suggested that he try a $500 device that would aim a low-intensity red LED light into his nose to stimulate his brain and stabilize or perhaps even reverse the symptoms of dementia. On the surface, it seems like a modern version of snake oil designed to separate desperate people from their money, but I am open to the idea if it might be an effective treatment. Is there any tangible evidence to suggest that photobiomodulation reduces the symptoms of dementia? — R.C.

Every now and then, my wife encourages me — REALLY encourages me — to put on pants, get out of the house and go hang out with friends for some “boy” time. After all, I serve as the sole representative of semi-masculinity in a family that includes my wife, three teen daughters, and various female pets who still haven’t forgiven me for having them fixed — the pets, I mean.

I recently listened to a convocation address given by the president of my undergraduate alma mater. One line of his speech jolted me: “The Bible is actually very clear that we come to know the will of God through our minds and not our emotions.” In other words, in all things spiritual the head has supplanted the heart. I believe that our culture, in many respects, feels the same in the privileging of the cognitive over the emotive in all aspects of life. Being “emotional” is considered a mark of immaturity while those who are more intellectually inclined are seen as more sophisticated and urbane.