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Many things can be self-taught.

I’ve known people who taught themselves how to sow sweaters. When I was a theological student, I met a woman who taught herself how to read biblical Greek in a matter of a few weeks. My wife’s uncle was a successful investment firm manager by day, but self-taught wood worker by night. He got so good at woodworking that if you walk into a brewpub in Milwaukee today, you will likely sit at a table that he made.

The latest controversial removals of secular historical monuments and memorials have me thinking about reminders of history in the Bible, where physical tokens were intended to remind God’s people both of what were arguably bad events and of what were arguably good events.

In recent years, we’ve been hearing a lot about the possible demise of shopping malls in America, and in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the situation seems particularly dire–especially for us nostalgic dweebs of the 1980’s who depended on malls for our embarrassing fashion choices and futile dating rituals. Well, I say it’s time to take a stand, and I’m proud that my three daughters (and my Visa card) are doing everything in their power to keep malls alive and me in debt.

Every human life is equally created by God the Father through our biological parents, objectively redeemed by His Son Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, and subjectively sanctifiable by the Holy Spirit’s work through His Word and Sacraments. And so, every human life is equally valuable to God, as every human life should be equally valuable to us.

I don’t know about you, but the next time I hear someone refer to the “new normal,” I think I might scream into my middle daughter’s unacceptable new bikini bottoms that I plan to confiscate and turn into a coronavirus face mask. If adjusting my daily activities according to COVID-19 protocol is now the norm, I’m ready to declare myself an official freakazoid, which is how most people (especially my family members) see me, anyway.

Oil production costs are down sharply in Texas in recent years, but they are not yet at a level to maintain viability given current prices and uncertainty. As a result, significant disruptions in oil production areas are occurring.

It is a hidden spot and would be the envy of many if they only knew of its existence.

Her neighbors refer to it as a paradise island and feel it should receive a paradise of the month sign according to one particular neighbor. During the day it is virtually alive with the melodies of birds and rabbits venturing around to check out the lush green and beautifully landscaped yard.

Recently our 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Bible Study, “Salvation History is Our Story”, has been studying Jesus’s extended teaching in the upper room on the night when He was betrayed. I had previously preached and led studies on portions of what is sometimes called Jesus’s “Farewell Discourse”, but I had not previously looked at it so carefully and holistically.

As we adjust our daily schedules to the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are suffering from acute boredom. Students are suspending their homeschool teachers without pay for excessive grouchiness, children are traumatizing their pets by repeatedly dressing them in Superman and ballerina outfits, and adults are resorting to binge-watching Tiger King on Netflix–again. One necessary diversion from this “new normal” is a trip to the supermarket, which has transformed from a mundane activity into a full-contact version of Guy’s Grocery Games.

As many church-goers, streamers, and downloaders will hear tomorrow, the Fourth Sunday of Easter (also known as “Good Shepherd Sunday”), Jesus identifies Himself as the Door of the Sheep, Who came that the sheep may have life and have it abundantly (John 10:1-10). Do you feel as if you abundantly have life?

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Its 2020, and we all want clear vision. I’ve noticed a plethora of signs and advertisements from businesses, non-profits, and even churches who are seeking a “2020 vision” for the future.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Mother’s Day is upon us. If you’re a mother, you’ll enjoy the recognition you get from your family on this day. And given the health concerns caused by the coronavirus, your appreciation of family may be even greater this year. As we all know, mothers have a difficult job. And many mothers a…

As we adjust our daily schedules to the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are suffering from acute boredom. Students are suspending their homeschool teachers without pay for excessive grouchiness, children are traumatizing their pets by repeatedly dressing them in Superman and ballerina outfits, and adults are resorting to binge-watching Tiger King on Netflix–again. One necessary diversion from this “new normal” is a trip to the supermarket, which has transformed from a mundane activity into a full-contact version of Guy’s Grocery Games.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Recently, we’ve seen an increased interest in mindfulness, although the concept itself is thousands of years old. Essentially, being mindful means you are living very much in the present, highly conscious of your thoughts and feelings.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

As we adjust our daily schedules to the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are suffering from acute boredom. Students are suspending their homeschool teachers without pay for excessive grouchiness, children are traumatizing their pets by repeatedly dressing them in Superman and ballerina outfits, and adults are resorting to binge-watching Tiger King on Netflix–again. One necessary diversion from this “new normal” is a trip to the supermarket, which has transformed from a mundane activity into a full-contact version of Guy’s Grocery Games.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

There’s no way to sugarcoat it: If you’re an investor, you haven’t liked what you’ve seen in the financial markets recently. The effects of the coronavirus triggered a market “correction” – a decline of 10 percent or more – and more volatility is almost certainly on the way. But instead of fretting over your investment statements, you could consider some more positive approaches to this situation.

I wish I were writing this from the perspective of a person who had just lived through a traumatic event. That way I would have more peace of mind. Unfortunately, I am writing at the beginning of such an event. It gives me peace, though, to look back at the history of our country, our community and our company.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.