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“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.

“For unto us a child is born, Unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of His government and peace, there will be no end, upon the throne of David a…

People talk about “cancelling” Christmas due to the coronavirus, though some talk more-precisely about cancelling the usual “celebrations” of Christmas, such as limiting holiday gatherings to one household, which would mean that people who live alone would spend Christmas alone.

What is wrong with our World? Look around, and you will see suffering, tragedies, sorrow, evil and death. Why is the world such a mess? Perhaps it is because man is polluting the world, or maybe it is big government overreaching and enslaving the citizens. On the other hand, it could be unco…

One television viewer may cheer for or yell at game-show contestants and another television viewer may cheer for or yell at athletes or the referees of their competition, but both viewers would probably admit that their responses at home do not really make a difference to the outcome of the …

I’ve known people who say that they are not religious—not Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, or Muslim. Sociologists of religion would classify such individuals as “nones.” The Pew Research Center on Religion and Public Life came out with a study last year that found Protestantism and Catholicism in rapid decline in the United States while the religiously unaffiliated portion of the country is growing exponentially. My own denomination, the Presbyterian Church (USA), has shrunk by more than half since 1980. Last year the Southern Baptist Convention saw the largest percentage drop in church membership in the last 100 years. Are we headed to a place in our country where religion is all but obsolete? Are we becoming a religion-less society?

The latest controversial removals of secular historical monuments and memorials have me thinking about reminders of history in the Bible, where physical tokens were intended to remind God’s people both of what were arguably bad events and of what were arguably good events.

Kilgore folks know Travis Martin as the co-founder and longtime chairman of the Kilgore Boys & Girls Club and Kilgore Lions Club member, as well as a major supporter of Kilgore ISD and Kilgore College athletics.

Every human life is equally created by God the Father through our biological parents, objectively redeemed by His Son Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, and subjectively sanctifiable by the Holy Spirit’s work through His Word and Sacraments. And so, every human life is equally valuable to God, as every human life should be equally valuable to us.

Recently our 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Bible Study, “Salvation History is Our Story”, has been studying Jesus’s extended teaching in the upper room on the night when He was betrayed. I had previously preached and led studies on portions of what is sometimes called Jesus’s “Farewell Discourse”, but I had not previously looked at it so carefully and holistically.

As many church-goers, streamers, and downloaders will hear tomorrow, the Fourth Sunday of Easter (also known as “Good Shepherd Sunday”), Jesus identifies Himself as the Door of the Sheep, Who came that the sheep may have life and have it abundantly (John 10:1-10). Do you feel as if you abundantly have life?

“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.

“For unto us a child is born, Unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of His government and peace, there will be no end, upon the throne of David a…

People talk about “cancelling” Christmas due to the coronavirus, though some talk more-precisely about cancelling the usual “celebrations” of Christmas, such as limiting holiday gatherings to one household, which would mean that people who live alone would spend Christmas alone.

What is wrong with our World? Look around, and you will see suffering, tragedies, sorrow, evil and death. Why is the world such a mess? Perhaps it is because man is polluting the world, or maybe it is big government overreaching and enslaving the citizens. On the other hand, it could be unco…

One television viewer may cheer for or yell at game-show contestants and another television viewer may cheer for or yell at athletes or the referees of their competition, but both viewers would probably admit that their responses at home do not really make a difference to the outcome of the …

I’ve known people who say that they are not religious—not Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, or Muslim. Sociologists of religion would classify such individuals as “nones.” The Pew Research Center on Religion and Public Life came out with a study last year that found Protestantism and Catholicism in rapid decline in the United States while the religiously unaffiliated portion of the country is growing exponentially. My own denomination, the Presbyterian Church (USA), has shrunk by more than half since 1980. Last year the Southern Baptist Convention saw the largest percentage drop in church membership in the last 100 years. Are we headed to a place in our country where religion is all but obsolete? Are we becoming a religion-less society?

The latest controversial removals of secular historical monuments and memorials have me thinking about reminders of history in the Bible, where physical tokens were intended to remind God’s people both of what were arguably bad events and of what were arguably good events.

Kilgore folks know Travis Martin as the co-founder and longtime chairman of the Kilgore Boys & Girls Club and Kilgore Lions Club member, as well as a major supporter of Kilgore ISD and Kilgore College athletics.

Every human life is equally created by God the Father through our biological parents, objectively redeemed by His Son Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, and subjectively sanctifiable by the Holy Spirit’s work through His Word and Sacraments. And so, every human life is equally valuable to God, as every human life should be equally valuable to us.

Recently our 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Midweek Bible Study, “Salvation History is Our Story”, has been studying Jesus’s extended teaching in the upper room on the night when He was betrayed. I had previously preached and led studies on portions of what is sometimes called Jesus’s “Farewell Discourse”, but I had not previously looked at it so carefully and holistically.

As many church-goers, streamers, and downloaders will hear tomorrow, the Fourth Sunday of Easter (also known as “Good Shepherd Sunday”), Jesus identifies Himself as the Door of the Sheep, Who came that the sheep may have life and have it abundantly (John 10:1-10). Do you feel as if you abundantly have life?

Its 2020, and we all want clear vision. I’ve noticed a plethora of signs and advertisements from businesses, non-profits, and even churches who are seeking a “2020 vision” for the future.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

Much has changed regarding the coronavirus since both my column March 7 and my colleague Rev. Will Wilson’s column March 14. Cases and deaths have increased. Markets have gone even lower. Food and other supplies are scarcer. Restrictions are tighter. More churches have completely shut-down or gone completely online.

A poll out this week suggests that less than 80 percent of U.S. Roman Catholics believe in the devil and that, of those, less than 80 percent (about 62 percent of the whole) believe the devil is not merely a personification or a symbol of evil but actually a fallen angel. Yet even those numbers are better than the quarter of American Christians surveyed more than a decade ago who said that they totally accepted the Bible’s teaching about the devil.

Its 2020, and we all want clear vision. I’ve noticed a plethora of signs and advertisements from businesses, non-profits, and even churches who are seeking a “2020 vision” for the future.

Colossians 1:19 and 20 read like this: “For in him (Christ) all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.” Paul, here, speaks of Christ’s incarnation (vs. 19) and Christ’s crucifixion (vs. 20) as the means through which God effects reconciliation. That is to say, reconciliation not just for us but for the whole of creation.

This Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020, is the 47th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which gave women a constitutional right to abort the lives of children conceived in their wombs. That right may or may not withstand future Supreme Court scrutiny, such as that in a case related to a controversial Louisiana law, which will be heard in March of this year, by what is thought to be a more-conservative Supreme Court than that which heard its last case.

I recently listened to a convocation address given by the president of my undergraduate alma mater. One line of his speech jolted me: “The Bible is actually very clear that we come to know the will of God through our minds and not our emotions.” In other words, in all things spiritual the head has supplanted the heart. I believe that our culture, in many respects, feels the same in the privileging of the cognitive over the emotive in all aspects of life. Being “emotional” is considered a mark of immaturity while those who are more intellectually inclined are seen as more sophisticated and urbane.

As I wrap up my sermon series at the church on the Ten Commandments, I ask which one is the hardest for me to keep? By the way, none of us obey any commandment perfectly. We all break them, all of them, in one way or another.

“I cannot be an optimist, but I am a prisoner of hope.” These words spoken by Dr. Cornel West of Harvard Divinity School obviously assume a conceptual difference between optimism and hope. What is the difference? Are Christians called to be optimists or people of hope? Can we be both, or should we choose one over the other?

In connection with a televised town-hall on LGBTQ+ issues earlier this month, Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke said that he was in favor of revoking the tax-exempt status of churches that oppose same-sex “marriage”. Aside from the arguments for and against churches’ in general having such tax-exempt status, the federal government’s denying particular churches’ tax-exempt status because of what they teach or do certainly seems to be contrary to the First Amendment of the United States Constitution’s prohibition of “establishing” one religion or permitting another’s free exercise.

A Sixth-Annual Symposium in Kilgore will take up the topic “Christianity as it relates to the LGBTQ+ Community”, and everyone is welcome to attend the free event, Sunday, November 3, 2019, from 3:00-5:00 p.m., in the Devall Student Center Ballroom on the campus of Kilgore College (1116 Broadway Boulevard, between Nolen and Elder Streets, in Kilgore, Texas).