• 0

You won’t see any greeting cards celebrating it, and it’s not likely to be on your calendar, but in just a few weeks, National 401(k) Day will be observed. And this type of recognition may be warranted, too, because 401(k) plans have become key building blocks for a big part of people’s lives – a comfortable retirement. Are you making the most of your 401(k)?

Submit Your News

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Mother’s Day is upon us. If you’re a mother, you’ll enjoy the recognition you get from your family on this day. And given the health concerns caused by the coronavirus, your appreciation of family may be even greater this year. As we all know, mothers have a difficult job. And many mothers a…

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Recently, we’ve seen an increased interest in mindfulness, although the concept itself is thousands of years old. Essentially, being mindful means you are living very much in the present, highly conscious of your thoughts and feelings.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Mother’s Day is upon us. If you’re a mother, you’ll enjoy the recognition you get from your family on this day. And given the health concerns caused by the coronavirus, your appreciation of family may be even greater this year. As we all know, mothers have a difficult job. And many mothers a…

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Recently, we’ve seen an increased interest in mindfulness, although the concept itself is thousands of years old. Essentially, being mindful means you are living very much in the present, highly conscious of your thoughts and feelings.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

DEAR DR. ROACH: A few months ago, my husband was told that his prostate cancer has returned. He now has stage 4 cancer. We asked all of his doctors (five of them!) what his prognosis is and received wildly varying answers -- everything from two months to maybe 10 years. I understand that his prognosis depends on many factors, but is there a reason his physicians can't give us a better idea? I also want very much to know if he will be in pain, and they won't give me an answer about that, either. Can you help? -- S.S.

Recently, we’ve seen an increased interest in mindfulness, although the concept itself is thousands of years old. Essentially, being mindful means you are living very much in the present, highly conscious of your thoughts and feelings.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I am having a serious, lengthy battle with cellulitis on my lower leg. For nearly three months, nothing any doctor has recommended or prescribed has worked. The inflammation and skin discoloration have not abated even with three days of intravenous injections of antibiotics and three courses of antibiotic pills. I have soaked my leg in Epsom salt, used antibiotic creams, Vicks rub, aspirin for inflammation, raised my leg when I am sitting — all to no avail. The doctors I have seen seem to have thrown up their hands and offer no resolution. Every medical person who sees my leg immediately diagnoses the problem to be cellulitis. An ultrasound showed no blood clot.

DEAR DR. ROACH: There are a lot of flu cases in my state, and people are very worried. My mom, a retired nurse, says that I should wash my hands several times a day for at least 20 seconds each time, including under my nails, between my fingers, and the backs of my hands, because that will also prevent colds and other respiratory illnesses. She had to do this before entering an operating room, but this seems like overkill otherwise. Won’t a flu shot take care of any problem? — P.L.L.

DEAR DR. ROACH: I have recently been diagnosed as having early stages of cataracts. Is there anything I can do to reverse the cataracts or reduce their progression? I am 67, don’t smoke, drink in moderation, and have a glucose level under 100. I hear lanosterol eyedrops show promise. Is there any harm in trying them? — M.L.

DEAR DR. ROACH: My husband and I are very fortunate to have had a happy relationship for many years. Our lovemaking has always been a pleasure for both of us. Now, we have to add Viagra to the mix. Sometimes it works; sometimes it doesn’t, which is a disappointment to both of us. Is there anything we can do to enhance its effectiveness? Or is there something else you can recommend that would do what we wish Viagra would do consistently? — Anon.

DEAR DR. ROACH: My 78-year-old father is experiencing the early signs of dementia. It has been suggested that he try a $500 device that would aim a low-intensity red LED light into his nose to stimulate his brain and stabilize or perhaps even reverse the symptoms of dementia. On the surface, it seems like a modern version of snake oil designed to separate desperate people from their money, but I am open to the idea if it might be an effective treatment. Is there any tangible evidence to suggest that photobiomodulation reduces the symptoms of dementia? — R.C.

It might not have made the headlines, but a recently passed piece of legislation could affect the IRAs and 401(k)s of millions of Americans beginning in 2020. So, if you have either of these accounts, or if you run a business, you’ll want to learn more.

Why do you invest? For many people, here’s the answer: “I invest because I want to enjoy a comfortable retirement.” And that’s certainly a great reason, because all of us should regularly put money away for when we’re retired. But you can also benefit by investing in your family and your community.