Deluge creates daffodil dilemma


William Wordsworth said it best when he wrote:

I wander’d lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

MRS. LEE’S DAFFODIL GARDEN opened and then closed this week to the dismay of visitors. The heavy rains in February and early March first delayed the opening of the beautiful 816-acre tract of land in which 28 acres bloom yellowish- gold by daffodils.

“The gardens were opened earlier this week, but then Thursday afternoon, we were informed a bridge on the property had collapsed and the gardens were closed for the rest of the season,” said Lois Reed, manager’s assistant to the Gladewater Chamber of Commerce.

“I have already directed two groups of visitors to the gardens in other areas of interest this morning,” she continued. “We are sad this happened, but understand we cannot control Mother Nature.”

Before the bridge failure, visitors traveled along the 4-mile trail that winds around two lakes, between wooded valleys, and around a replica pioneer log home. Photogenic areas and picnic spots lure visitors and families back year after year.

The trails on the property are dirt roads and not paved – when the weather is bad the roads become impassable.

Calling the collapse of the bridge near one of the lakes a catastrophic failure, the caretakers of the gardens have taken the initiative to keep it closed the safety of future visitors.

You can learn more about Mrs. Lee’s Daffodil’s Gardens at

CAN’T YOU JUST HEAR the lawn mowers purring and the tractors puttering across the lawns late in the evening now that Daylight Savings time is finally here? Move that clock forward one hour before going to bed this Saturday night so you won’t be late for church on Sunday.

“YOU would think with the time change this weekend that spring was just around the corner (for us),” said former Kilgoreite Mart Lapin. “Well, let me tell you, we are forecast to get upwards of 18 inches of snow Wednesday and Thursday and another 4-5 inches on Friday and Saturday. We are already more than 20 inches above average so far.” Mart lives in Maine.

GETTING A RUSH on the Spring season was the Hedrick family last weekend as Don Hedrick hosted his annual bonfire, infamous beans, “hotdogs or whatever” to family and friends.

Approximately twenty-four people (including his mom and dad) to the gathering. “It is always just a fun time,” said Don. “Mother Nature cooperated perfectly. The weather couldn’t have been better.”

MERLYN HOLMES, director of the East Texas Oil Museum and Rangerette Museum was the guest speaker at the First Baptist Builder’s luncheon held last Wednesday. Her talk drew a large crowd to the church as she provided updates of both museums, history, murals and donations received from the families of East Texas and beyond.

“They were wonderful,” said Merlyn. “I gave a little history of when it was built and what it was about and mentally took them through the museum as if they were walking with through it.”

“Many do not realize that President Roosevelt had a big hand in our having such beautiful murals in the museum. On loan to us right now, are murals that hung in our old post office. They are on loan to us from the Kilgore Historical Preservation Society and I really hope they don’t take them back,” she said.

“Most of the people at the luncheon had been to the oil museum many times and had donated items in the past,” she said. “They were just great.”

Bobby Bittick also added to the program by telling how Lion’s Club members Hyman Laufer and C.A. Bonham helped in the selection of donations to the museum.

BOOK TALK at the McMillan Memorial Library will take place at noon on March 20. Mary Pat Eaves will be the special guest speaker as she reviews Guerrilla Priest by Stephen Griffiths.

May His Love and Laughter Fill Your Hearts and Your Homes Throughout the Week. Remember to spring forward. In the meantime, we may be reached at 903-984-2593 or